Depression During Pregnancy and Postpartum - Mindful Life Counseling

Do I Have Postpartum Depression?

  • Do you feel run down and tired but can’t sleep?
  • Does life seem to have lost its luster and you have difficulty finding enjoyment in things?
  • Have you noticed that you’re feeling more anxious or nervous recently?
  • Does the daily stress of life feel like it’s too much?
  • Do you feel really sad or find that you have been crying for little to no reason?
  • Are you having trouble bonding with your baby or just feel disconnected?

If you answered yes to 2 or more of these questions, you may have postpartum depression.

Other symptoms of postpartum depression (PPD) include:

  • Intense feelings of anger or irritability
  • Lack of appetite or eating more than normal
  • Feeling like your head is in a fog
  • Scary thoughts of harm coming to you or the baby

 

  • Feelings of guilt or shame
  • Lack of interest in things you used to enjoy
  • Difficulty concentrating or remembering things
  • Thoughts of harming yourself or of not wanting to live

Other symptoms of postpartum depression (PPD) include:

  • Intense feelings of anger or irritability
  • Lack of appetite or eating more than normal
  • Feeling like your head is in a fog
  • Scary thoughts of harm coming to you or the baby
  • Feelings of guilt or shame
  • Lack of interest in things you used to enjoy
  • Difficulty concentrating or remembering things
  • Thoughts of harming yourself or of not wanting to live

You are not alone.

About 1 in 7 new moms and 1 in 10 new dads will experience postpartum depression, so you’re in good company if you’re struggling. (Postpartum anxiety is even more common. Read more here.)

Among those who have spoken up about their battle with PPD are:

  • Gwyneth Paltrow
  • Courtney Cox
  • Brooke Shields
  • Vanessa Lachey
  • Hayden Panettiere
  • Alanis Morissette
  • Drew Barrymore
  • and many others

It’s not your fault.

One of the most heinous symptoms of depression is that moms often blame themselves and carry an immense amount of shame regarding who they feel.

“What is wrong with me?”

“Why don’t I love my baby?”

“Why can’t I be a good mother?”

Let me say this now: There is nothing wrong with you. You do love your baby. You are a wonderful mom.

You are a strong, beautiful new mother. But depression doesn’t care.

It doesn’t care who you are, where you came from, or how much money is on your 401k; no one is immune.

Postpartum Depression is Highly Treatable.

What that means is that it responds well to treatment- typically talk therapy, such as CBT, medications, or possibly a combination of both.

Despite this, only about 15% of those who have postpartum depression will receive appropriate treatment. While PPD is temporary, when left untreated the symptoms can manifest for years.

Why are so few women treated? For one, the stigma of mental health. So many people are afraid to ask for help as they might then be perceived as weak.

Also, despite postpartum depression being the most common complication following childbirth, health care providers rarely screen for it.

Dr. Ruta Nonacs of Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School had this to say about the topic, “Postpartum depression is far more common than gestational diabetes. All women receiving prenatal care are screened for diabetes, but how many pregnant and postpartum women are screened for depression? PPD is also more common than preterm labor, low birth weight, pre-eclampsia and high blood pressure; in other words, PPD is the most common complication associated with pregnancy and childbirth.”

PPD often goes undiagnosed and untreated. This is not fair to the new mama and can have lasting effects on the baby.

If you’re struggling with postpartum depression, please don’t wait to get the help that you deserve. 

You can heal. You can feel joyful again. You can be whole again. Call today!

Dr. Ruta Nonacs of Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School had this to say about the topic, “Postpartum depression is far more common than gestational diabetes. All women receiving prenatal care are screened for diabetes, but how many pregnant and postpartum women are screened for depression? PPD is also more common than preterm labor, low birth weight, pre-eclampsia and high blood pressure; in other words, PPD is the most common complication associated with pregnancy and childbirth.”

PPD often goes undiagnosed and untreated. This is not fair to the new mama and can have lasting effects on the baby.

If you’re struggling with postpartum depression, please don’t wait to get the help that you deserve. 

You can heal. You can feel joyful again. You can be whole again. Call today!

Think you might have postpartum depression or anxiety? Not sure? Let's talk!

Schedule your free consultation online 24 hours a day. Pick a time that works for you, and we will discuss what you have been experiencing, talk about your treatment options, and determine what is the best fit for you.

There is no pressure and no obligation. I want you to get the help you need and deserve, even if it's not with me.